Cyber Risk Assessment– get good at it

Today’s reliance on IT technology is unparalleled and will only increase. While some businesses are pondering the benefits of IoT deployment or bespoke business applications, others are ploughing ahead and pioneering their initiatives. Some of these initiatives are stuttering and some are big winners that have transformed their business. Digitisation and it’s attendant benefits is the new game in town and it is not going away soon.  

The constant question that new initiatives will always raise is, what about cyber security? These new initiatives also need to be balanced against new compliance regimes such as GDPR which can levy punitive fines for breaches involving sensitive personal data. IoT means a greater footprint or attack surface; a new cloud application means potential exposure of data or the possibility of unauthorised access. While these risks and others exist, this should not hinder businesses taking advantage of the potentially major opportunities from digitization. What is therefore of paramount importance is a way to effectively assess and mitigate the risk from these initiatives and other IT activities that will enable the businesses to safely adopt new technology. 

 

Cyber security is everyone’s concern 

Cyber security is no longer just an IT issue, now it is definitely everyone’s concern. Responsibility is now being devolved as applications move to the cloud. More departments are involved in selecting and implementing their apps, therefore they also need to have security at the forefront in both the selection and operational processes. 

 

Comply with regulation or become extinct 

Regulation is now gaining real teeth and therefore compliance is no longer an optional nuisance. Consider the Carphone Warehouse breaches recently. If the recent 6m records breach occurred under the watch of GDPR, the fine could be a whopping £428m, compared with the max £500k fine which could have been levied under the previous Data Protection Act. Compliance is now an imperative and failure could mean business extinction due to the punitive fines.  Compliance should be seen as an opportunity to get your business in shape in which case everyone benefits. 

 

Cyber risk assessment is a specialism 

Change is another constant in IT, therefore risk assessment should be constant and continuous. Oftentimes risk assessments are left till the end of an initiative when in fact it should feature right at the beginning and be a part of the “go/no go” decision. If risk assessment is built into project implementation, the end result will definitely look a lot better than if it were an after thought. The struggle is to find the skills where there is a good understanding of IT risk management. It is an area where businesses need to invest in training staff at all levels of the organisation. 

 

Risk assessment and mitigation needs to be a continuous process where all departments in a business are engaged in continuing assessment, monitoring and improvement of the risk exposure.  

 

An interesting development in this light is a joint solution offered by Aon, Apple, Cisco and Allianz. The components of the solution include the following; 

  • Risk Assessment with a target output of an analysis of the businesses level of insurability, its security posture with recommendations on how to correct any gaps.  
  • Those wishing to improve their security posture receive a plan that includes an enterprise ransomware solution incorporating, advanced email security, endpoint protection and DNS layer security.  
  • The business will also deploy Apple MacOS and iOS endpoints.  
  • Businesses choosing this solution will receive favourable terms from Allianz who consider this combination to be a more secure solution.  

 

While it may not be practical for all businesses to adopt this solution, the method/approach is a useful indication of a what can be done. The importance things is the assessment needs to be continuous and reflect the status of the business and it’s use of IT at any point in time which of course is a moving goal post.

5 Takeaways from the Carphone Warehouse Breach

The Carphone Warehouse breach is the biggest so far announced in the post GDPR era.

What are the salient points to note from this breach? 

  1. 6 million records accessed 
  2. NCSC, ICO, FCA investigating 
  3. 3 million records accessed in 2015 breach 
  4. Cyber security risk identified by board in last FY report 
  5. If GDPR applies, maximum fine of £420m could apply 

 

A recently announced massive cyber attack at Dixons Carphone Warehouse has resulted in significant unauthorised access to millions of records including personal data. It appears that two breaches occurred which resulted in; 

 

  • 6 million customer records being stolen including 5.9 million payment card details  
  • 1.2 million customer records including name, address, email 

 

In January Carphone Warehouse were fined £400,000 for a breach that occurred in 2015 when 3m customer records (including personal details) and 1,000 employee records were stolen. 

 

Dixons say the breach was only discovered in the week leading up to the announcement and it actually occurred in the July 2017. Under the Data Protection Act they would be liable to a maximum fine of £500,000. Under the new GDPR regulation the fine could rise to a maximum of £420m based on last years’ global turnover of £10.5bn. 

 

In their most recent report, Dixons identified information security as a risk and their potential vulnerability to malware and cyber attacks. They identified potential consequences that could include reputational damage, reduced cash flow, financial penalties, reduced revenue and profitability, loss of competitive advantage. Dixons did appear however to be heading in the right direction to manage the risk ensuring senior management oversight including a Strategic Improvement Plan and increased investments targeted at managing the information/cyber security risk. 

 

The independent regulator the ICO is investigating the current breach along with the FCA and NCSC. The ICO has said it is yet to determine whether GDPR or the 1998 Data Protection regulations will apply. 

 

The NCSC is working on how the breach has impacted UK citizens and what measures can be taken to prevent such a breach re-occurring. They have also published guidance on what to do for people who think they have been affected by the breach. 

 

The CEO Alex Baldock has apologised saying that they have fallen short of expected standards. He confirmed that they have called in cyber experts to investigate as well as relevant authorities and the unauthorised access has now been blocked. 

 

Anyone affected or concerned about their personal data being accessed and how it could be used should contact Action Fraud. 

 

The breach came to light as a result of a massive attempt to compromise the cards in a card processing system, this means that someone tried to use the card details to take unauthorised payments. 

 

Dixons shares fell 6% following the announcement of the breach. 

 

Useful Resources

GDPR Readiness Test [Checklist]
GDPR 12 Step to take NOW [Infographic] 
9 Steps to Implement a Security Management Tool [eBook]

 

 

5 Cyber Security Threats Businesses are Facing in 2018

We all know the cyber threat landscape is rapidly evolving and it is a real struggle to keep apace with the threats much less get ahead of them, which ideally is where we should be.
Organisations especially those small to medium sized ones have limited resources in terms of people, money and time to commit to all the areas they need to focus on.
It is therefore vital that their approach to cyber security is focused on the areas that will have the greatest impact in terms of threat prevention. Let’s discuss the most common cyber threats that organisations are likely to face which therefore should help to determine the main areas where protection efforts need to be focused. These threats are;
  • Socially Engineered Malware
  • Password Phising
  • Unpatched Software
  • Social Media Threats
  • Advanced Persistent Threats

Socially engineered malware

Every year, hundreds of millions of successful attacks are conducted by socially engineered malware programs. A typical form of this is data encrypting ransomware which is downloaded either in email attachments or trojan horse software downloaded from a site hosting malware. The unsuspecting user is enticed into clicking a link or opening a document which then installs the malware, oftentimes the user is prompted to bypass security controls if they are in place for this particular type of exploit. The malware is installed on the host machine and can then disable defences  such as anti-virus, conduct callbacks to command and control centres which then lead on to the exploits. Exploits could include data gathering and exfiltration or encryption of data and horizontal propagation of the malware.
This type of threat sometimes requires the use of elevated privileges. Techniques that could be used to help prevent this type of threat include;
  • avoiding giving elevated privileges for daily tasks
  • constantly educate users about these type of threats
  • deploying advanced endpoint protection
  • not relying solely on traditional anti-virus

Password phishing

Phishing has become a huge industry for cyber scammers and it is estimated that approximately 80% of global email is spam. Anti-spam techniques deployed by email providers are becoming better are blocking spam how ever the attackers are constantly refining their approach and inevitably some is still getting through to user’s inboxes. Most of us are so busy we do not bother to hover over the links to check for a valid url and
sometimes they are so well crafted it is so easy to miss.
The best protection against phishing apart from good anti-spam software is user education along with policies that encourage the use of 2 factor authentication such as smartcards, sms messages, etc.

Unpatched software

Unpatched software is a major threat due to the existence of known vulnerabilities that could be protected from if the latest available patch is applied. This problem while common for client applications such as web browsers, and ancillary apps such as adobe and java are also quite common on server systems. I am sure you have seen many instances where critical servers running core business systems are unpatched and carry literally hundreds of vulnerabilities.
Software patching needs to be a part of the IT operations processes and undertaken in a regular and systematic manner to avert an easily avoidable vulnerability.

Social media threats

Social media is pervasive and an essential part of an organisations digital presence. It has therefore become a target for cyber attackers to find exploits and cause reputational damage or extort money from unsuspecting users and owners. The threats could start off as simply as a friend request or application install which then develops into something completely different. One example is a response to a post where a visitor may voice
dissatisfaction with a service. The response offers to provide assistance and redirects the person to a fake site where their usernames and passwords are requested and then exploited on the real social media site.
Yet again user education is a must to help protect against this type of threat and 2 factor authentication could also prevent compromise of username and passwords.

Advanced Persistent Threats

The majority of large organisations have been the subject of advanced persistent threats but that is not to say that small-medium organisations are not affected by this also. The attacker may initially use phishing or trojans to infect one machine but once they get hold of a machine, they extend their reach throughout an organisation and steal data within hours oftentimes remaining undetected for months.
The best way to combat advanced persistent threats is to deploy next generation detection and protection capabilities. Typically such measures will profile the normal network traffic and behaviour thus creating a baseline against which anomalous behaviour can be profiled and alerted.
You may have noticed an underlying theme in terms of the best way to
mitigate most of these threats involved user awareness. The benefits of this cannot be understated and there are some low cost good user training subscriptions that could save organisations a ton of money in costs associated with a successful cyber attack.
It is also however very important to do the basics well such as patching, endpoint protection, password policy and network security.

Cyber Resilience | The Framework you Should Follow

Have you sometimes found yourself bewildered by the sheer volume of bad news out there especially about emerging cyber threats and actual attacks. It is not uncommon to wonder when you will come under a similar threat or worst still is it happening already but you just haven’t detected it yet. What would give us more comfort is understanding that we were cyber resilient to threats to a large extent, sure nothing is ever 100% guaranteed but it would sure be good to a high a high level of confidence about our ability to survive such an eventuality.

So what would good cyber resiliency actually look like?

Cyber resiliency is really about keeping the business operational despite an attack or incident. It is about the organisation having the systems, processes and controls in place to detect an attack, contain it, recover or maintain operations despite the attack and clean up the affected systems.
Some specific objectives of cyber resilience would include the following.
  • Prevention–apply basic cyber protection mechanisms as well as more advanced cyber security controls to reduce the risk. In addition, threat intelligence is applied to keep the protection relevant
  • Cyber response preparation– create and maintain cyber incident scenarios to train staff and maintain a good level of readiness. If an incident happens, there is a plan and people know what to do
  • Minimise service degradation- in the instance of an attack
  • Identify potential damage- and change resources to limit further damage
  • Maintain trust relationships- and review trust of restored systems
  • Effective controls- understand the effectiveness of cyber security controls in relation to the nature of the adversaries
  • Review systems architecture and restructure to reduce risks
The NIST have published some recommendations that could help with achieving cyber resilience and some of these are outlined below.
A word of caution, this is not for the faint hearted as it reads as if from a military manual.
Adaptive Response- maximise the ability to respond in a timely and appropriate manner to adverse conditions thus limiting business impact and maintaining operations.
Analysis and monitoring– maximise the ability to detect attacks by extensive monitoring that can reveal the extent and scope of an attack. We have seen how AI and Machine Learning is playing an increasing role in this area
Coordinated Protection– implemented a range of protection measures that follow the defence in depth principles thus ensuring that attacks will need to overcome multiple mechanisms in order to be successful
Deception– conceal critical equipment or resources from the attacker, this could include techniques such as encryption or multi-layered firewall approach
Diversity– limit the likelihood of successful attacks on common replicated systems forcing attackers to breach different systems necessitating multiple variants of malware
Dynamic Positioning– distribute and dynamically relocate system resources, this could easily be achieved in a resilient cloud environment, this could go a long way to supporting recovery and continuity as well as making it more difficult for attackers to determine the infrastructure topology
Non Persistence– generate and create resources as needed and avoid the likelihood of intrusions through backdoors left on unused resources
Privilege Restriction– restrict access privileges based on attributes of users and systems as well as environmental considerations i.e. do not give admin rights to a user connected via an Internet café or via a country you have no business with
Redundancy–provide multiple instances of critical business systems to aid recovery from failure of primary systems
Segmentation– define and separate elements of your systems based on their criticality and attribute permissions accordingly. This will help to prevent the spread of malware and give further protection to critical systems
Unpredictability– make random and unpredictable changes to increase uncertainty for attackers thus making it more difficult for them to determine their attack sequence
These techniques put together will go a long way to achieve a high degree of cyber resiliency, which will result in the ability to manage the cyber risk and maintain operational services especially in times of persistent attack

7 infographics from the Cisco 2018 Cyber Security Report explained

In our final part of Cisco’s 68 page 2018 Annual Cyber Security Report, we summarise the key findings and highlight the main takeaways contained in the report.
While most of the information is already known, put in context it gives a thorough view of the changing landscape and importantly identifies some of the steps that Information Security teams could take to mitigate the growing risk.
The reports highlights include;
  • Self-propagating ransomware is a growing trend
  • Legitimate cloud platforms are increasingly being exploited for cyber attacks
  • Cyber attackers are exploiting gaps in security coverage as organisations move to the cloud
  • Lack of skilled cyber security staff is a growing problem
  • Security is more effective when policies governing technology, processes and people are synced
  • Scalable cloud security, advanced endpoint protection and threat intelligence can be deployed to reduce the cyber threat risk
According to the Cisco report, cyber attackers are amassing their techniques and capabilities at an unprecedented scale.
Ransomware is the most profitable form of malware and has evolved into self-propagating network based cryptoworms as witnessed by Nyetya
and WannaCry. These ransomware variants took down whole regions and
sectors of infrastructure such as the Ukraine and the NHS.
Cyber attackers are weaponizing the cloud and using legitimate cloud services from well known vendors such as Google, Amazon, Twitter to host and conduct malware attacks. They are in fact capitalising on the benefits of cloud platforms such as security, agility, scalability and good reputation, oftentimes repurposing their sites before they are detected.
Cyber attackers are exploiting gaps in security coverage including IoT and cloud services especially where the organisation has not extended their security controls to include securing users and data in the cloud. Another growing obstacle to more effective cyber security is lack of skilled cyber security personal and inadequate budgets.
Cisco’s report also provides some essential guidance that organisations
should adopt in order to meet the growing challenge and provide more effective cyber security protection. Some of these measures include;
  • Implementing scalable cloud security solutions
  • Ensuring alignment of corporate policies for technology, applications and processes
  • Implementing network segmentation, advanced endpoint security and incorporating threat intelligence into security monitoring
  • Reviewing and practising security response procedures
  • Adopting advanced security solutions that include AI and machine learning especially where encryption is used to evade detection
While the security report is essential reading for all personnel responsible for an organisations information assets, in many areas it reiterates what we have been hearing about in the news and trade publications. The essential call to action is really to make a good start by doing the essentials. If you have already done this, then keep testing, refining and improving your cyber security posture.

5 Takeaways from the Cisco 2018 Annual Cyber Security Report

Cisco Annual Cybersecurity Report 2018

Cloud abuse on the rise according to Cisco Security Report

Cisco’s Annual Cyber Security Report 2018 provides an insightful account into the changing cyber security landscape. This article summarises some findings of the report pertaining to cloud security.
Some main take aways from the report that will be discussed in this blog include:
  • Legitimate cloud services such as Twitter and Amazon being used by attackers to scale their activities
  • Machine-Learning is being used to capture download behaviour
  • Cloud Security is a shared responsibility between organisations and its provider
  • There is an increase of belief in the benefits of cloud security
  • Cloud abuse is on the rise
According to the report, increased security was the principle reason security professionals gave for organisations deciding to host corporate applications in the cloud.
Fifty seven percent believe the cloud offers better data security
Organisations who have a security operations team are likely to have a well defined cloud security approach that may include the adoption of Cloud Access Security Broker (CASB) as they deploy to the cloud.
Many smaller organisations however are adopting cloud services without a clear security strategy, there is therefore a blurring of the security boundaries where many organisations are not certain about where their responsibilities end and where the responsibility of the cloud provider starts.
Security in the cloud is a shared responsibility: Cloud Security, DNS, IaaS PaaS Saas
Security in the cloud is a shared responsibility
Cyber attackers are increasingly taking advantage of this blurring of the boundaries to exploit systems.
An increasing trend amongst cyber attackers is to use legitimate cloud services to host malware and command and control infrastructure. Public clouds that have been used for malware activity include Amazon, Google, DropBox and Microsoft.
This makes it doubly difficult for security teams to identify bad domains and take protective measures without risking significant commercial impact caused by denying user access to legitimate business services.
Examples of legitimate services abused by malware for C2
The misuse of legitimate services is attractive to cyber attackers for a number of reasons;
  • Easy to register a new account and set up a web page
  • Adopt use of legitimate SSL certificate
  • Services can be adapted and transformed on the fly
  • Reuse of domain and resources for multiple malware campaigns
  • Less likely that infrastructure will be ‘burned’ (service can just be taken down) with little evidence of its purpose
  • Reduce overhead for attacker and better return on investment
Cyber attackers are effectively using legitimate and well known cloud infrastructure with their attendant benefits; ease of scale, trusted brand and secure features such as SSL. This enables them to scale their activity with less likelihood of detection if current protection methods are retained.
The challenges posed for the security teams defending organisations from these new threats call for a more sophisticated approach because in effect you need to block services that users are trying to access for legitimate work such as Amazon or Dropbox. Furthermore, the legitimate services are encrypted and so malware will be encrypted and evade most forms of threat inspection techniques– the threat will only become apparent after it has been activated on a host.
Intelligent cloud security tools will need to be deployed to help identify malware domains and sub-domains using legitimate cloud services. Such tools can also be used to further analyse related malware characteristics such as associated IP addresses, related domains and the registrant’s details.
An emerging and valuable approach to detect anomalous behaviour is machine learning.
Machine learning algorithms can be used to characterise normal user activity, unusual activity can be identified, and action taken automatically.
Machine-learning algorithms capture user download behaviour 2017
To meet the range of challenges presented by cloud adoption,
organisations need to apply a combination of best practices, advanced security technologies, and some experimental methodologies especially where they need to overcome the use of legitimate services by cyber attackers.

Would you like to learn more? Claim your Free copy of our latest eBook “A View of the Cyber Threat Landscape”. Click here.

What’s HOT What’s NOT: Cyber Security 2018

What are the main cyber security trends and focus areas for IT Managers and Chief Security Officers so far in 2018?

One thing we know for sure is that cyber security won’t be taking a lower profile as IT embeds itself at the core of organisations becoming a true business enabler.
IT is at the core of organisations and if there is a glitch then the business impact is profound. It is therefore beneficial to be able to focus limited resources and efforts on the priorities that will really
make the biggest difference.
 So the question is what will be HOT and what will NOT in 2018. The list below, while not being exhaustive, gives a focus on what you should be prioritising.

 HOT

  • GDPR
  • Ransomware
  • Cloud

NOT

  • Anti-Virus
  • VPNs

HOT: GDPR

25th May 2018 is the date the GDPR will come into force. The regulation will affect literally every organisation that holds personal data. With the increasing regulatory powers for investigation and enforcement, firms not complying with the regulation could face severe penalties.
GDPR must, therefore, be high on the list of business priorities and a comprehensive approach to GDPR compliance will necessitate a comprehensive review of policy, process and technology.
In a recent article we discovered that 52% of medium sized business have NOT made changes/prepared for GDPR!

NOT: Anti-Virus

In the face of the new breed of sophisticated, adaptable forms of cyber attacks, traditional Anti-Virus is becoming redundant. The approach of traditional Anti-Virus which is based of signatures relies on threats having been detected and updates being propagated to clients before an attack occurs.
Organisations need multiple layers of protection to stand any chance of detecting and blocking new threats some of which can dynamically probe and adapt to the host environment.
Anti-Virus is still essential especially if it also monitors for abnormal behaviour, however if it is your primary line of defence, expect the worst, as Robert Mueller says, you will be attacked, depending solely on Anti-Virus increases the likelihood of it happen sooner and more frequent.

Related Resources

HOT: Ransomware

2017 saw the spread of global ransomware variants Wannacry and Nyetya. Wannacry made significant parts of the NHS powerless while Nyetya caused major losses for businesses. Fedex counted losses in excess of $300m and at one stage had to resort to WhatsApp for internal communications due to compromised email systems.
The ransomware ‘business model’ has stepped up a notch with it being made available to buy as a service. The avatar of the attacker has suddenly changed from a stereotypical hoody wearing geek to just about anyone who can pay with some Bitcoin.
Ransomware has been the most profitable form of cyber attack to date and franchising it just made it cement it’s pole position as the number one threat in 2018.

Related Resources

NOT: VPNs

Statistics indicate that nearly 50% of workforces are mobile, meaning they access their organisation’s IT applications from remote locations to the organisation’s offices. The ubiquitous VPN has been the secure way of connecting.
 With the various flavours and increasing range of users requiring connections, VPNs are becoming a greater management overhead and an increasing security risk especially if the controls are not kept up to date with the threats.
A need for a more sophisticated and granular method of providing remote access is emerging where users are connected only to what they require, when they require it and furthermore their security posture is established even before they are allowed any connectivity.

Cloud: HOT

Organisations having realised the benefits of cloud adoption have embraced it while mitigating the risks as best they can. The benefits of the cloud in many instances include lower operational costs, agility, increased resilience and scalability.
Cloud adoption is also well suited to the growth of a mobile workforce who need anytime anywhere access to their applications. Securing the cloud data and user access is however an area of cloud implementation that is emerging as a focus area that businesses have not paid sufficient attention to.
Technologies such as secure DNS and the secure Internet gateway are solutions that are highly likely to gain a lot of traction as organisations audit and protect cloud connectivity from a range of emerging cyber threats.

Related Resources

There will inevitably be questions about security topics such as BlockChain, IoT and Phishing just to name a few. Let us know how your list wouldn’t be different.

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I made a call, the customer said no, but I loved it

 

We have been doing our cloud security blog now for a couple of weeks and decided to start to speak directly to some of the contacts who had been reading the blogs. I spoke to one contact from the legal sector (who shall remain nameless) who gave some very interesting feedback.

 

The bad news is that the call did not end up in a sale or a trial of the software, and they didn’t want to meet with us or try out any of our services so there is no fairy tale ending here.

 

What was more interesting was that the customer said about Umbrella cloud security and his current IT partner.

 

On the subject of Cisco Umbrella, he said they had been using it for over a year now and “it was absolutely brilliant”. The ability to automatically block bad domains and to investigate suspected threats was extremely good and he was very happy that they had decided to deploy the product.
Furthermore, he said it was introduced to him by their IT provider whom they have worked with for nearly 10 years now. He said it was a very strong partnership where they had offered an exceptional quality of service, they weren’t the cheapest but it would just be silly for them to look elsewhere at this stage because you get what you pay for and they certainly were getting very good value for money. He felt it would be silly of them to be looking to change under such circumstances. I said to him I hoped my customers felt the same way about the service we provide as we certainly strive to differentiate ourselves in this way. He thanked me for the call and we went t our separate ways.

 

Wow this is what I have been banging on about for what seems a lifetime, it’s not about being the cheapest or biggest, but rather about providing good value for money.

 

What was even more satisfying is the fact that he appreciated what we had been writing about in terms of cloud security and the importance of DNS security. He was totally happy with the Umbrella product and now couldn’t see them operating without it.

 

So I am really happy that though this customer said no to us, they endorsed what we believe and what we have been banging the drum about.

 

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What Will You Pay? Costs of a Cyber Attack

What will you pay?

With a 750% increase in ransomware attacks in 2016, a first layer of defense is needed.

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Take Control with CASB and DNS

Its been a cloudy blog of a fortnight (pardon the pun but I couldn’t help it). To summarise we have been looking at the changing IT landscape and the consequent change in the threat landscape. We then looked at how organisations need to change their approach to cloud security to address this new reality.

 

The age of digitisation is bringing about a dramatic change to the IT landscape. Digitisation is about new efficient ways of doing things at scale. It’s about automation and new ways of engagement with customers in a way that suits them and at a time that suits them.

 

Digitisation is turning century old industries on its head as new players emerge that are agile, visionary and creative at a rate it’s outpacing their peers.

 

The new IT landscape is about DevOps “scoring an end goal” around or despite IT. Being applied to conceive and deploy apps in a fraction of the time it used to take using a conventional approach. Its about using the cloud to take advantage of Infrastructure, Platform or Software as a Service and being able to globally scale an application.

 

The new IT landscape is also about anytime anywhere access for users/employees. Power is being devolved to branch offices because they need better connectivity to access their new apps in the cloud. Analysts are saying that approximately 50% of users now access their applications remotely and 25% actually work remotely.

 

We also need to factor the explosive growth of IoT and the pervasive use of mobile devices to access the web.

 

Digitisation is a bright new horizon but it also brings major security headaches. Some of these include;

  • A massive increase in cyber attack landscape, more devices, more apps, more points of access
  • Increase in the number of alerts security teams need to process and understand
  • More applications to monitor and manageLack of visibility in what users are doing and how they are using apps
  • The growth of shadow IT exposing corporate information and services to attacks
  • Outdated non-cloud savvy security relative to the emerging landscape

 

Cyber attackers have evolved in sophistication to keep apace of the changes in IT. They constantly evolve their exploits, they are offering attacks as a service, they are using cloud scale computing power as well. Cisco’s annual cyber security report identifies that the scale and sophistication of attacks have increased over the past 12 months.

 

Security teams need to evolve their approach to security making it cloud centric with the ability to protect users and data anywhere anytime. Remember cloud services still require organisations to take responsibility for the security of their data. Gartner has identified that 95% of data breaches will be the fault of the end user.

 

Some of the essential tools that security need to include in their new armoury include secure DNS services as well as CASB services. DNS will block access to malware sites before they happen, or if a machine has been infected, it will block the command and control call back. CASB has the ability to monitor user activity in the cloud, profile applications in use and prevent data leakage. Both tools can also provide invaluable visibility into the normal behaviour of users and trigger protective actions and alerts as and when behaviour varies from the norm.

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